Pollinator Heroes

Crown Bees recognizes many researchers and citizen heroes that have advanced the understanding of bees across North America. We’ll be adding to this list in honor of Pollinator Week from June 16-22. Since we have numerous heroes to cover, anticipate for Pollinator Heroes Month! Dr. Jim Cane Dr. Cane is a research entomologist for the United States Department of Agriculture. He has been studying solitary bees for 30 years, from evolutionary origins to supplement larval diet. Within his studies of solitary bees, he’s also done research on their pollination services in the wild and in agriculture. Dr. Cane’s work has helped to measure
Read More

BeeGAP Overview

Bee Gardener Adding Pollinators (BeeGap) Orchards and crops need bees for pollination.  The honey bee, a wonderful pollinator, is in crisis and will need help from additional pollinators. Today, the orchard manager is primarily focused on honey bee pollination due to the strength and depth of the honey bee industry. Many farmers don’t realize the value of the solitary mason bee yet. There are benefits of being a mason bee keeper. Mason bees are efficient pollinators. For instance, in the photo below, 100 mason bees would have produced these bins of cherries. It takes about 560 honey bees to produce
Read More

BeeGAP Roles

Each person in BeeGAP is important in ensuring that quality bees are pollinating bees in orchards.  Below is an outline of each position as we understand it today.  We’ll be updating this as we help various positions be formed, understood, and performed by individuals, groups and companies. Media We need many gardeners supplying excess cocoons to farmers.  One hundred thousand gardeners supplying 100 extra cocoons will meet current 2014 demands for just the almond industry.  There are many other crops than need pollinating other than almonds! Responsibility: Please help gardeners understand the importance of a “Garden Oasis”.  A garden free of
Read More

Garden Oasis

How would you define a garden oasis? We suggest two different perspectives: From a bee’s perspective:  From an sustainable perspective, a garden that stands out from all other yards is organic, or is less or chemical-free, year after year. As a result, there is plenty of pollen, healthy plants and nutrient-rich soil, and bees a-buzzing for years to come. To create a garden oasis for bees here are our suggestions. We ask of you to carefully think through the placing of any chemicals into your yard. Systemic pesticides, broad spectrum sprays, etc. are not healthy for your beneficial insects. There
Read More

BeeGAP “How it Works!”

We’ve thought this through carefully.  It is simple in concept… The gardener learns to successfully raises solitary bees for their yard and winds up with too many bees.  These excess bees are consolidated with other local gardener’s excess cocoons. The bees are then used wisely in regional orchards/crops. Let’s go a bit deeper: We’ve already reached you.  We’re trying to reach others through blogs, magazine articles, FaceBook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc.  These bees are gentle, easy to raise, and are needed for our future food supply. Crown Bees has a lot of information in our website to teach you how to
Read More

BeeGAP Story Ideas for Writers/Bloggers

Crown Bees would like to help you write articles/blogs about BeeGAP and the drive to change gardener’s yards into bee havens and a garden oasis.  Share with us your interest, timing, and requirements, and we’ll get in touch with you quickly to assist.  Your success is important to us.  Contact us Bee  Gardeners Adding Pollinators BeeGAP is already active in many states. Small businesses are active or are being created to coordinate gardeners who will supply mason bees A few orchards are just now beginning to learn about and use solitary bees to pollinate Many gardeners are unaware of solitary
Read More

Organic Gardening (A brief overview)

There is nothing mysterious or magical about organic gardening. It is simply a way of working with nature rather than against it.  The objective is to recycle organic matter back into the soil, to maintain soil structure and fertility, and to encourage natural methods of pest and disease control, rather than relying on chemicals.  It is, in fact, a lot less mysterious than the methods employed by the chemical grower.
Read More